Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Understanding Page Border Art.

Understanding Page Border Art

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 14, 2016)

If you add page borders to your document, you already know that you can use special artistic treatments for the borders. For instance, you may want the page border to be comprised of a line of apples, stars, candles, or some other object. Word provides a wide array of artwork that you can use for borders.

The artwork used for borders is stored in a proprietary file format. The artwork is not in a normal format, such as GIF, JPG, or TIF. Instead, the artwork is in files that end in .BDR. You can find them on your hard drive by using the Find feature from the Start menu, and searching for any file ending with a .BDR extension. There are 15 such files, typically stored in the \Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Borders folder. (The actual path may vary, depending on the version of Word installed on your system.)

Because the border artwork is stored in a proprietary format, you cannot add your own custom artwork for borders, nor can you use any artwork stored in a different format for borders.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (674) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Understanding Page Border Art.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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