Using Relative HTML Font Sizes in Word 2000

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 21, 2008)

One of the ways that Word 2000 allows you to save your documents is in HTML format. This means that the document created is suitable for display on the Web, and viewable with a Web browser.

When it creates a Web document, Word 2000 saves quite a bit of information in the HTML document. This information is Word-specific. It is not necessary for your Web browser, and is only useful if you are planning on loading the HTML document back into Word 2000 at a later date. One element that it records is font sizes. The Web, by default, doesn't support a large number of different font sizes and typographical conventions. It certainly doesn't support as many as Word can. So Word 2000 stores that information in a created HTML document anyway, tucked away so that it can decipher it when you later load up the document in Word.

Some people don't like the way that font formatting is done by Word 2000. Instead, they prefer to take advantage of the "relative" font sizing that is a natural with the Web. The relative font sizing allows the browser--and the user through the browser--to specify the relative size of the text that appears on-screen. This can be a great feature to some people. Word, however, doesn't use the relative font sizing, instead trying to make the font appear as close to what the document author used as possible.

One solution to this is to realize that Word 2000 does include quite a bit of Word-specific "baggage" with each HTML document. If you are not going to load the document back into Word, you can get rid of the baggage. You can either do this the tedious way, or the somewhat-less-tedious way. The tedious way, of course, involves opening the HTML file in a text editor and removing all but the bare HTML code that is necessary for displaying your information. This requires, of course, that you be fairly conversant in HTML coding.

The somewhat-less-tedious way involves the use of a Microsoft add-in for Word 2000 (called the Office 2000 HTML Filter) that will remove all the Word-specific HTML code for you. The add-in is free; you can learn more about it (and download it) at the following address:

http://officeupdate.microsoft.com/2000/downloadDetails/Msohtmf2.htm

Even after running the Office 2000 HTML Filter, you may still want to open the file and examine to resulting HTML code to make sure it displays information exactly as you intend. While this may require at least a conversant knowledge of HTML, it doesn't require all the tedious steps of doing the removal and recoding yourself.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1454) applies to Microsoft Word 2000.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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